White House hosts summit on community colleges

The Associated Press (via Yahoo News) reports that the White House is hosting a summit on community colleges emceed by Vice President Joe Biden‘s wife, Dr. Jill Biden, who is a longtime community college instructor and a former literacy and special education teacher in K-12. President Obama spoke to the summit attendees today as the summit kicked off.

President Obama said that community colleges are the “unsung heroes of America’s education system” that  “may not get the credit they deserve,” nor resources comparable to other post-secondary institutions. “[Community colleges] provide a gateway to millions of Americans to good jobs and a better life,” he added.

Advertisements

One response to “White House hosts summit on community colleges

  1. Community colleges may not be the answer for Latino students.

    http://www.edexcelencia.org/research/latinos-community-colleges

    Attainment

    • Latinos are less likely to attain any degree if they start at a two-year institution instead of a four-year institution. Of Latino first-time postsecondary students starting at a two-year institution, less than 35% had attained any degree in 6 years. In comparison, almost 55% of Latino students who started at a four-year institution had attained a degree in 6 years. [NCES, Digest of Education Statistics, 2003, Table 313]

    • Latinos who start at two-year institutions are more likely to drop out without a degree. Almost 50% of Latino students who started at a two-year institution had not attained a degree and were no longer enrolled 6 years later. In comparison, only 25% of Latino students who started at a four-year institution left without a degree and were not enrolled 6 years later. [NCES, Digest of Education Statistics, 2003, Table 313]

    • Latinos who start out at two-year institutions are less likely to transfer and attain a bachelor degree. Only 5% of Latinos who started at a two-year institution during the 1995-96 academic year had attained a bachelor degree in 2001. In comparison, of Latinos who started at a four-year institution, 44% had earned a bachelor degree. [NCES, Digest of Education Statistics, 2003, Table 313]

    http://www.EdExcelencia.org Prepared by: Deborah Santiago